Living Conditions

Yarsa woman preparing food on her clay stoves.

Yarsa woman preparing food on her clay stoves.

GARY: This picture shows the typical conditions inside the houses they are living in. If you look on the right side, you can see kind of a mud/clay stove, and that’s exactly what it is. That’s what they cook on and that’s what they heat with. There’s no chimney. What are the insides of the houses like, Son?

Jacob driving the Bobcat to clear earthquake rubble, so new homes can be built.

Jacob driving the Bobcat to clear earthquake rubble, so new homes can be built.

JACOB: They’re basically a ton of tin, two or three pieces of plywood, and five or six 2’x4’s.

GARY: It was pretty sad. Jacob arrived and spent the last week with me there, and it was an experience. At first, the people didn’t think that I, the owner of the foundation, would work, because that’s just something that isn’t done.

And then when my son came and they saw him working, that was another shock to them. It was so beautiful, because we just got in and became a team, didn’t we? And everybody just did what was needed. This was when Jacob arrived. There’s Jacob in the Bobcat moving debris from the collapsed homes, so we could start preparing for the foundations.

Preparing the School Site

GARY: Boy, the kids were excited! I spent 3½ days on the school site dismantling the old tin sheds that they had put up for the schoolchildren, so I could level the ground. Then we could start pouring the foundations. After I drove the backhoe off from the site after leveling it, it didn’t take the children even 5 minutes to show up there.

What was interesting is that I talked to the village people about the children needing an athletic field, and they said, “No, no, no, no; they don’t really play sports.”

JACOB: Well, we sure figured that story out in 5 seconds.

Boys playing soccer on the ground that was newly leveled to rebuild their school.

Children playing soccer on the ground that was newly leveled to rebuild their school.

GARY: What were the kids doing in this photo?

JACOB: Looks like they’re playing soccer.

GARY: Yes, and how many hours did they play soccer?

JACOB: Only about 3 or 4!

GARY: Yes! And they told us, “Oh, let’s not build the school here. We want to play soccer!”

Making Bricks to Rebuild Yarsa

GARY: Wasn’t that amazing when the brick factory arrived finally? Incidentally, the brick factory I shipped in came from Johannesburg, South Africa. It took 4 months to get it there by the time it went from the boat in Johannesburg to Calcutta, India, and then overland to Katmandu, and then on to Yarsa.

Celebrating the installation of the brick factory Gary bought for rebuilding Yarsa.

Celebrating the installation of the brick factory Gary bought for rebuilding Yarsa.

JACOB: It almost took us that long to get it out of the truck!

GARY: And the people in the village had to rebuild the 2½-mile road before we could get the semi in to offload the brick factory. It was amazing to watch them, wasn’t it?

JACOB: It was. The brick factory came on a low-bed trailer, and we didn’t have a wiring system or cable to pick it up. So the people said, “No worries, we’ll go get some old cable over there, and we’ll just put a couple of knots in it, and then you can pick it up.” So they came back with this cable, somewhat knotted up. We hooked onto the brick factory and started picking it up, and we were worried that it wasn’t going to make it at all.

GARY: It was pretty scary, wasn’t it?

JACOB: It was. But you know, those people really know how to make knots! It just really made the load come right out of that truck easily; and then once we set it down, we all thought, “Whew! Okay, next thing.”

 

Gary and His Son Jacob in Nepal

Gary and Jacob Young at Foundation Night

Gary and Jacob Young tell about their experiences in Nepal at Foundation Night, 2016.

GARY: I’d like to invite my son Jacob up on the stage with me. Jacob, what was your first impression when we drove into Yarsa?

JACOB: Well, my first impression was when I first arrived that the people all thought, “Oh it’s Gary’s son. He’ll probably just go sit in the tent and do whatever he wants.” So when I started to work there, they were all wondering, “Is he really going to work?” It was amazing for them to see that I actually started helping and working with them. They were very shocked by that and were extremely pleased.

They’re such friendly people. It doesn’t matter how many times I visited them in a day, they would always come by and do their “thank you” greeting, which is “namaste.” It was very sweet to see that. And they always had a smile on their face.

The friendly people of Yarsa village show their gratitude for the help brought them by Gary and Jacob Young and the D. Gary Young, Young Living Foundation.

The friendly people of Yarsa village show their gratitude for the help brought them by Gary and Jacob Young and the D. Gary Young, Young Living Foundation.

When I first arrived, I could see just how happy they were to actually have someone helping them. When I was talking with other people, and a lady was helping me translate, they said, “Everyone else around us was getting help, and we asked them to help us, but no one would.” So when my dad came down in January the first time and they started to get help and hope, they were so much happier.

GARY: Was it a fulfilling time to witness and experience what was taking place there?

JACOB: It definitely was. I know that when we go out to help an older man or lady walk across the street, we feel good about ourselves—or when we do a good deed that day or do what our mom or dad asked. When you do something good, you feel good about yourself. Going to Nepal and helping those people out, I got an experience and a feeling that I had a greater purpose in life. It was a feeling you’ll never get unless you go help people in need out there in the world.

Meeting the Man from Nepal

The beautiful children of Yarsa, Nepal, show the traditional Hindu greeting “Namaste,” which means, “I bow to the divine in you.”

The beautiful children of Yarsa, Nepal, show the traditional Hindu greeting “Namaste,” which means, “I bow to the divine in you.”

The trip to Nepal came about when I was on a speaking tour. I was in Japan in November doing some meetings for our members, and a doctor I’ve known for 17 years called my room and asked me if I would be willing to meet with a gentleman from Nepal, who wanted to talk with me about the devastation in his country. I agreed. So I went to the doctor’s office and met the man from Nepal, who told me about some of the problems they were experiencing.

I said, “But millions and millions of dollars have been raised for Nepal. What is the problem?”

He said, “The banks won’t release it. The NGOs [non-governmental organizations (non-profits)] won’t release the money to the people of Nepal.”

[Sixteen of the world's largest disaster relief charities have revealed to the Thomson Reuters Foundation that they are spending up to a sixth of funds designated for Nepal on their overheads rather than in disaster-hit areas, according to a Reuters report, September 22, 2015. This report also stated: “Affected communities have denounced the response to the twin quakes in April and May as too slow, with some claiming to have seen scant evidence of nearly $475 million raised through UN appeals.”]

It is absolutely criminal what many of these NGOs are doing with the money people are donating in good faith, which should be used to help the people of Nepal.

The man from Nepal said, “Mr. Young, is there any way you can come to Nepal and help us? We’re getting no help from no one, period.”

So that’s why I made the first trip the 4th of January 2015. I went back in February and again last month [July]. It was a heart-jerking experience every time I went, but my goal was to bring hope to some of the people of Nepal.