When Wheat was Wheat!

Hybrid wheat gives the farmer more grain to sell. But in this case, more is not better! It is not more nutritious, and it is not more healthful. Hybrid wheat is worse than empty calories.

Hybrid wheat gives the farmer more grain to sell. But in this case, more is not better! It is not more nutritious, and it is not more healthful. Hybrid wheat is worse than empty calories.

When I was a little boy, my dad grew nonhybridized wheat. He originally brought that wheat from Huntington, Utah, which the family had raised there back in the late 1800s. Of course back in those days, families would grow their wheat, oats, and barley for the year’s crop and for what they needed to put away for the winter; and then they would always put some seed away for the next year’s planting. Nobody bought seed in those days; they grew their own seed and carried it over from year to year. We grew wheat and oats primarily.

So the wheat my father planted on our farm is what he brought from Huntington, Utah, when they moved from there to southern Idaho in 1921 in iron-tired, covered wagons. Then in Idaho, on the Snake River where they homesteaded and started their farm, his father and uncles planted the seed that they brought from Huntington, Utah. Their wheat was not hybridized wheat or grain because it didn’t exist then except by nature’s natural hybridization process that happens through cross pollination of plants.

The wheat that we grew when I was a boy in the late ‘40s and early ‘50s was taller than us children. When my sister Nancy and I were 4, 5, 6, 7 years old, part of our job was walking behind the horse binder and shocking the shocks of grain and standing them up like teepees. Then we would play in them. We could run inside and hide, they were so tall.

As I got older, I thought, well, what happened; how come as I grew up, the wheat grew shorter? It didn’t make sense to me. Then when I traveled the world, I started seeing wheat that looked like the wheat that I played in when I was a boy. What happened?

This is a picture I took of the einkorn that I grew at the farm last year. As you can see, the heads are pretty small. Much different than hybrid wheat.

Finding the Real Staff of Life

Gary’s book tells of his worldwide search to find a healthy grain like the wheat of his youth. He now has einkorn grain growing on three of his Young Living farms.

Gary’s book tells of his worldwide search to find a healthy grain like the wheat of his youth. He now has einkorn grain growing on three of his Young Living farms.

As you will read in my new book, Ancient Einkorn: Today’s Staff of Life, my mother was one of the people in my life who really drove me to start looking for answers. I couldn’t understand how a person 26 years old could have rheumatoid arthritis and suffer as much as my mother did with swollen joints that just continued to swell more and more every day.

As I’ve written in my book, an early memory with my mother was when I was in Grade 3. One night she was sitting in the rocking chair beside the wood stove. Her hands were hurting her and I couldn’t figure out what to do. So I just took her hand and started rubbing it; and she said, “Oh, Son, that really helps.” Then she said, “I want you to do well in school, because I want you to become a doctor. You’ve got healing hands.”

I  said, “Mom, I don’t want to be a doctor; I want to be a cowboy like my dad.” Well, here we are.

My desire to find an answer had a lot to do with my mother and watching what she went through in her journey through life and her death that just kept driving me and driving me, looking for answers.

My mother was a key focus, but I saw the thousands of people around me as clients, friends, distributors, and associates who were suffering with similar conditions as my mother; and I said, “There has to be an answer. This is not what God sent us here for.”

What was the answer? So I started looking.

Gluten Doesn’t Have to Be Poison

In this 2001 photo, Gary discovers einkorn as he conducted research in Azerbaijan.

In this 2001 photo, Gary discovers einkorn as he conducted research in Azerbaijan.

Was the last meal you had gluten-free? Well, I’m providing you with something that you won’t have to worry about. I’m not about eating gluten-free. I’m about eating hybridization-free and GMO-free. How many of you are willing to go back to nature, instead of just taking something that’s essential out of your diet completely?

How many of you can remember the fat-free fad diet that was popular years ago, which said to take all of the fat out of your diet so that you don’t gain weight? However, the right kind of fat doesn’t cause you to gain weight, true or false? True, absolutely. You need fat to make hormones. That’s really important.

You need gluten because gluten carries essential minerals and amino acids that are crucial to your well-being. People who go on gluten-free diets are likely to find out five years from now that they’re going to have extreme nutritional deficiencies. So we are seeing another fad hit the market—which has been going on for about the last five years. It’s a fad. It’s a money game. Instead of looking for the balance, they look at how they can capitalize on it.

The gluten we’re eating today is very toxic, but we don’t correct a problem by taking out an essential ingredient. We have to first recognize that the ingredient that is toxic is not a natural ingredient; it’s a hybridized, man-structured agent.

So I’m here to share with you a little bit about that. I’ve had a grand journey during the last 20 years as I’ve been searching for the answers.

The Young Living Academy in Chongon, Ecuador

Young Living Member Jill Young with YuLeidy, the Chongon, Ecuador, child she is sponsoring.

Young Living Member Jill Young with YuLeidy, the Chongon, Ecuador, child she is sponsoring.

The Young Living Academy is being expanded to include preschool and high school for the children of Chongon, Ecuador. Students cultivate their own organic garden that contributes to their healthy, organic lunches; participate in soccer, baseball, volleyball, dance, music, chess, and drama clubs; and participate in student council.

Can I sponsor a child at the Young Living Academy?

Yes! By sponsoring a child at the Young Living Academy, you are contributing to his or her personal and academic development. You are helping children and young people become self-reliant, model citizens, and contributors of ideas and projects, with the intention of helping others and society. You will receive a photograph of the child you sponsor, as well as an email address and blog link to communicate regularly with the child. You have the opportunity to be a mentor and have a direct impact on the child’s life.

How do I sponsor a child?

We offer a variety of donation options for the Sponsor a Child program. You can make an annual or monthly donation, which equates to $75/month, which can be completed via credit or debit card. If you are a Young Living Essential Oils member, you can make your monthly $75 donation through a deduction from your commission check. [Click here to view donation options.]

Where do the children I am sponsoring live?

In Chongon, Ecuador, about 30 km outside of Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest and most populous city.

More Projects of the D. Gary Young Foundation

 

  • Donated products for fundraisers of multiple U.S.-based nonprofit organizations that are committed to helping children
  • Built two schools and a water system for the Tarahumara Indians in the Copper Canyon of Durango, Mexico
  • Provided support for the Cinterandes Foundation Mobile Surgery Unit
  • Donated a years’ supply of Omega Blue to The Heritage School in Provo, Utah, a residential treatment center for at-risk adolescents
  • Provided relief for those with leprosy in India
  • Provided earthquake and tsunami relief in Japan
  • Provided relief for Hurricane Katrina victims

 

In this photo Gary is sharing gifts with the Tarahumara children.

In this photo Gary is sharing gifts with the Tarahumara children.

 

 

To be continued.