Sixty-eight Feet of Dwarf Wheat

The bread aisle can be as long as 68 feet and 99.99 percent of it is made of hybrid dwarf wheat.

The bread aisle can be as long as 68 feet, and 99.99 percent of it is made of hybrid dwarf wheat.

Twenty percent of all calories consumed in the United States come from wheat products. In supermarkets, the bread section can be up to 68 feet long. Regarding that unhealthy bread from hybridized wheat, William Davis, MD, wrote: “It is the ultimate hubris [exaggerated pride or self-confidence] of modern humans that we can manipulate and change the genetic code of another species to suit our needs. . . . [T]oday, genetic modification and hybridization of plants we call food crops remain crude science, still fraught with unintended effects on both the plant itself and the animals that consume them.” [Wheat Belly, Rodale, 2011, p. 228.]

The effect of wheat hybridization on humans was not studied before dwarf wheat was released into the commercial market in 1956. Perhaps why I escaped that was because, as I mentioned, my father grew wheat, oats, and barley. So when we harvested a field, a certain amount of it was saved for seed for the next year, most of the rest was saved to feed the animals, and a small amount was set aside to feed the family.

We would grind that grain and make our cracked cereal for breakfast; and we would put the raw goat’s milk or raw cow’s milk on it, whatever we were milking at the time. Because father basically took sugar out of our house when I was five years old, we started eating honey for our sweetener.

When I left home and went to Canada to homestead, I took wheat seed to plant. Then I got so busy, I quit growing it; and one day I woke up and realized I was eating what was in the store.

Real Grain and Its Fake Cousin

The author of Wheat Belly, Dr. William Davis, posted this photo of wheat hybridization on his website (www.wheatbellyblog.com). It shows the much shorter hybrid semi-dwarf and dwarf wheat developed in the 1950s.

The author of Wheat Belly, Dr. William Davis, posted this photo of wheat hybridization on his website (www.wheatbellyblog.com). It shows the much shorter hybrid semi-dwarf and dwarf wheat developed in the 1950s.

While einkorn grain has 14 chromosomes, today’s dwarf wheat has 42. It’s a super starch, super sugar, and super gluten—really, it’s a super drug. Genetically manipulated in the laboratory, it has seeds that cannot survive in the wild, it is designed to be profitable, and it is easy to grow. They engineered it so that it has a very short stalk, so they don’t have to deal with the straw and the waste; and the shorter stalks hold up the heavy heads of grain. It’s not designed to improve health. It’s a “frankenfood.”

How many of you have walked into a store recently and tried to buy a loaf of einkorn bread? How many of you have walked into a store in the last two years and seen one side of the bread aisle with gluten-free breads? Mary and I have bought several different kinds of gluten-free breads over the past two or three years. Eating cardboard would be better. The gluten-free breads we’ve tried are so nonflavorful and nonappealing. In fact, I think we’ve got a couple of loaves of gluten-free bread sitting in our fridge now, and nobody will touch them unless we’re desperate.

Look at the bread aisles in your grocery stores; they’re staggering. It has been believed for years that bread is the staff of life; true or false? True, of course. The Bible says wheat is the staff of life. But it wasn’t talking about American hybridized wheat. It didn’t exist then.

Healthy Nonhybridized Wheat

Gary took this photo of Pakistanis threshing their einkorn wheat. Northern Pakistan doesn’t have dwarf wheat.

Gary took this photo of Pakistanis threshing their einkorn wheat. Northern Pakistan doesn’t have dwarf wheat.

For over 30 years, I’ve been watching the trend in our food supply; and the parallel of diseases with gluten consumption from hybridized wheat is scary.

I was in Morocco last year. We were driving down the road going into the hills to look for plants, and I saw wheat on the side of the road and said to the driver, “Pull over; I want to take some pictures of this wheat. I have not seen wheat that tall in a long time.” So he pulled over and I jumped out. I walked over to the field; and lo and behold, it looked like the wheat that I grew up on, nonhybridized wheat. I jumped back in the car and drove down the road to the other field, and it was the dwarf wheat.

I asked the agricultural engineer who was with us, “What’s the deal with the tall wheat there and this little short wheat here?” I didn’t want to say anything to him, I just wanted to hear what he had to say.

He said, “The tall wheat over there is our traditional nonhybrid wheat that we grow and eat here in Morocco.”

I said, “Well, what about this dwarf wheat here?”

He said, “Well, we grow that and export it for sale to make money. That’s the American wheat.” Interesting.

Well, here was my next question, “Have you ever heard of celiac disease?”

He said, “What’s that?”

I said, “It’s an inflammation in the gut that causes proliferation and a lot of other inflammation in the body, including pain, digestive problems, and bloating.”

He said, “Oh, we don’t have that in Morocco.”

I didn’t find it in Hunzaland, I didn’t find it in northern Pakistan, and I didn’t find it in Azerbaijan, either.

Real Nutrition from the Original Grain

Instead of overeating when you have pancakes or waffles, try Gary’s True Grit Einkorn Pancake and Waffle Mix and have some real nutrition that satisfies you!

Instead of overeating when you have pancakes or waffles, try Gary’s True Grit Einkorn Pancake and Waffle Mix and have some real nutrition that satisfies you!

When God created this planet, my personal belief is that that is when He planted einkorn. When you understand the structure of it and the nutritional profile of einkorn, I believe you will agree with me that God planted einkorn for the nourishment of mankind.

Because we are so accustomed to eating devitalized food, nutritionally depleted food, we have gotten into this craving for more food. Our body says, I’m not getting nutrition, keep feeding me. So we keep eating and eating and eating, and we expand and expand and expand; but our body is not being satisfied because we’re not getting enough nutrition.

So when you switch from the traditional eating to eating einkorn, you’re going to find that you’re going to keep eating and eating and eating because your body’s conditioned to that.

Here’s a hint. When you start eating einkorn, whether it’s the pancake mix or the spaghetti, eat like a Frenchman. Eat slowly. You will discover that all of a sudden, you’re full, because you ate slowly enough that the body was able to recognize the nutrition in it. You will eat half the amount of food that you’ve been accustomed to eating, because you’re getting nutrition.

There’s only one other thing on the planet that comes close to the nutritional value of einkorn. Can you guess what that might be? You have it. NingXia Red. You’re going to find out that the number of different items in your food storage is going to shrink, because you need only two things, einkorn and NingXia Red; and you’ll be set for life. Oh, you might want Chocolessence there for dessert, and you might want Slique bars for fun.

The Grain Called Einkorn

Those “amber waves of grain” are once again standing tall and proud at the Mona, Utah, farm that grows einkorn grain as well as lavender and other botanicals that are distilled for their essential oils!

Those “amber waves of grain” are once again standing tall and proud at the Mona, Utah, farm that grows einkorn grain as well as lavender and other botanicals that are distilled for their essential oils!

Now, I want to clarify something here. The wheat species is called Triticum. You will see einkorn referred to in other publications as “einkorn wheat” (Triticum monococcum). Well, that would be the same as saying “spelt wheat” (Triticum spelta) or “kamut wheat” (Triticum turanicum). You could lump them all together if you want.

However, einkorn is as independent in its identity as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, amaranth, or quinoa. It has its own identity. I don’t want you confusing einkorn with today’s hybridized Triticum aestivum wheat, so I refer to it as einkorn or einkorn grain.

There’s a lot of confusion in the translation from biblical Hebrew or Greek. What was the actual real name of this ancient grain? The Hebrew Bible translations talk about “chittim.” To this day, we don’t really know; but it has been identified now as einkorn, which is the German translation of this ancient grain, meaning “one grain.”

In my book, Ancient Einkorn: Today’s Staff of Life, I explain that einkorn has just 14 chromosomes, while modern dwarf wheat has 42 chromosomes. They are very different.

Between our farm in France and the farm in Mona, we are growing over 250 acres of einkorn. [Einkorn has also now been planted at the new Northern Lights farm in British Columbia, Canada.]