Category Archives: Essential Oils

From Mexico to Switzerland to France!

Gary’s phone call from the Swiss lady started an important journey. From Mexico he attended the conference in Switzerland, where he was invited by two of the presenters to go to Paris, France, where he obtained 13 therapeutic-grade essential oils.

Gary’s phone call from the Swiss lady started an important journey. From Mexico he attended the conference in Switzerland, where he was invited by two of the presenters to go to Paris, France, where he obtained 13 therapeutic-grade essential oils.

That 32-page paper was research by Dr. Jean-Claude Lapraz and Dr. Paul Duraffourd, working in a hospital in Paris, France. I was on fire when I read it. I couldn’t even sleep.

I called the lady who gave me the information at 6 o’clock the next morning; and before the phone finished ringing the first time, she picked it up and told me she was expecting my call and asked if I wanted to know more.

I said, “Yes, where can I learn?”

“There’s a seminar at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in one week.”

“Is it possible I can attend this?”

“Well, it will be in French.”

“Well, I don’t speak French.”

“If you want to go, I will pick you up at the airport, we’ll go on the train, and I will translate for you during this 40-hour seminar.” She did, and that was the beginning.

After the class I was invited by Dr. Lapraz and Dr. Duraffourd to go to Paris to make rounds with them in the hospital where they were conducting research on essential oils. I spent a week with them there and brought home 13 oils. And that’s where it started.

Rosarito Beach Years

D. Gary Young taken at his clinic in Rosarito Beach, Mexico, in the early 1980s.

D. Gary Young taken at his clinic in Rosarito Beach, Mexico, in the early 1980s.

In 1982 I opened my clinic in Rosarito Beach, Mexico, and Chula Vista, California. I had a tremendous experience for the next eight years. In 1985, while I was in Mexico doing studies in hematology and nutrition and really working with my clients, a lady came and brought her sister from Switzerland. As we sat down and talked, she said, “Dr. Young, what do you know about essential oils?”

I said, “Aromatherapy? Oh, been there, done it, no thank you, not interested.” I could see by her body gestures and energy that I had insulted her somehow. So I said, “Well, at least in my experience, I’ve seen no value in them.”

She replied, “Dr. Young, do you believe that the herbs that you have down in your apothecary and the herbs that you buy in the health food store are the same quality?”

I said, “Of course not; that’s why we gather the herbs, why I’ve created my own apothecary, and why we make our own formulas here.”

She said, “Well, essential oils are no different.” And the light bulb went on. She continued, “I’ve been coming to the United States to visit my family for the last 20 years, and there are no pure essential oils in the United States. There are perfume oils that they call aromatherapy oils; and, of course, they’re not going to work.”

Then she handed me a 32-page paper out of her briefcase and said, “I translated this for you in case you’re interested. It’s about research on essential oils.” I took it home and read it. She had translated it from French into English and had written the phone number where she was staying with her family in Alhambra, California, on the bottom with a note that said, “If you have an interest, call me.”

Life Changes in the 1970s

Even though a horrible logging accident on February 2, 1973, temporarily put Gary Young in a wheelchair, he can now be found each winter still logging. However, now he is logging balsam fir, black spruce, blue spruce, pine, and other conifers that are then chipped and distilled for the production of essential oils.

Even though a horrible logging accident on February 2, 1973, temporarily put Gary Young in a wheelchair, he can now be found each winter still logging. However, now he is logging balsam fir, black spruce, blue spruce, pine, and other conifers that are then chipped and distilled for the production of essential oils.

My life changed on February 2, 1973. I was logging and a big tree came back and hit me on the head, altering my life and changing my destiny.

There’s a belief that we get to choose our direction and what we do. That may be true for most people, but for me it was not true. Because of this accident, my life was forced to change directions. I feel that I was driven into doing what I do today; and I know that as long as I was cutting trees, I wasn’t making much of a difference in people’s lives.

I learned about essential oils in 1976 when I was in a metaphysical bookstore, and the owner said, “Gary, what do you know about aromatherapy?”

I replied, “Oh, I have heard the word a time or two, but I don’t know anything about it.”

She said, “Well, I have some oils here; would you be interested?”

So I said, “Well, yeah.” So I bought four oils, took them home with me, and started working with them.

By 1978, two years later, I hadn’t really seen any difference with them; and by 1980 I’d given most of them away, bought a few others, and given those away, too. But I never saw any real difference, no real change.

So by 1981-82, I disposed of the idea and thought aromatherapy was just snake oil, that it was just for those New Agers, and that it had no value because it didn’t change anything in my life.

A New Cabin and Cougar Hunting

Following in the footsteps of his big-game-guide father, Gary shoots his first cougar.

Following in the footsteps of his big-game-guide father, Gary shoots his first cougar.

Then we really upgraded. My dad built a cabin when I was age 4, a huge mansion. Imagine four of us living in a 16-by-20-foot cabin and then moving into this giant log cabin that was 30 by 30 feet. As our family grew, all eight of us lived there. It was very intimate and very interesting sometimes.

I was called the “bad boy” because I always picked on my siblings. It was so crowded that we had to do something for entertainment because we didn’t have electricity, we didn’t have TV, and we didn’t even have radio most of the time; only if the wind was blowing in the right direction and the signal would come up the canyon would we get a radio station.

This picture is when I was age 14 when I shot my first cougar. I learned to hunt. That was our life. My dad made his living as a big-game guide and outfitter.

This was life in the mountains. Yes, I haven’t changed much. My favorite pastime is every summer taking my boys and Mary and my horses and packing into the Idaho wilderness.

Gary’s Life Started in a Log Cabin

Gary’s father, Donald N. Young, on horseback in front of the family’s one-room cabin with a dirt roof.

Gary’s father, Donald N. Young, on horseback in front of the family’s one-room cabin with a dirt roof.

This is where it began for me. I was born in 1949 and this picture was taken in 1951. I lived in this cabin, a one-room cabin, with my parents and older sister Nancy, until I was 4 years old.

This picture is of my father sitting on his horse. It might give you an idea of where I got my love for horses. But that was our log cabin. It had a dirt roof and a board floor; and when we ate, the dust would sift down through the cardboard on the ceiling onto our plates. Mother would cover the table with a tablecloth to keep the dust from sifting onto our food. Then we’d just pull it back enough so that we could put food on our plates, and the pans with food would go back under the tablecloth.

We should go back to those days. You see, I didn’t drink chlorinated water. I drank the water that melted from the glaciers and ran off the mountain from the snowcaps. We ate only food that we grew, because my father said, “If we don’t grow it or shoot it, we don’t eat it.” While we were eating, we got minerals from the dust coming down from the dirt ceiling; and that’s what gave us a strong immunity, right, Sis? [Gary said this to his sister, Nancy Sanderson.] Absolutely.