Tag Archives: Ecuador

Eugenio Tells His Story

32517511342_8549911333_kMARY:  Gary, I think it would be very interesting if Eugenio told them what it was like for him in the beginning and let Nicolas translate.

GARY:  Yes. Can we get another microphone on stage?

NICOLAS:  Eugenio says that he didn’t expect to be here to talk, and now he’s going to tell the story about his life in Young Living.

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Eugenio and Nicholas

(Nicolas continues translating for Eugenio): In 2005 around November, I met the Young family. I was working in another place, doing security and also cleaning. When Dr. Gary was with his translator, he asked me, “How long have you been working in that place?” I was new there; I’m from Peru.

The next day Dr. Gary asked me to work helping at the distillery. I didn’t know what a distillery is. My first experience with the distillery was just contact with two little cookers and with a lot of his students from the university. Those cookers were the first experiments in Ecuador.

When I accepted the job, Dr. Gary asked me if I had family. I said, yes, I had two girls in Peru. He proposed that I bring our kids to Ecuador to be with us. I was very excited about that proposal.

We started working in Cuenca, and it is a cold city. My wife said, “Eugenio, I can’t live here; it’s too cold. We have to move to Peru again.” At that time my wife was pregnant with our son, who we named Jakob. After that, Dr. Gary told me we were going to move to Guayaquil, which is a hot city. That place is a comfortable place for my wife.

MARY: Para mi tambien.

NICOLAS: For Mary, too!

[Translating for Eugenio]: So I started working in Cuenca with just a little distillery with a lot of aromatic plants, doing experiments with Dr. Gary and a lot of university students. Today, I am very happy to be with Dr. Gary and Mary.

My son and my daughters have grown up with Dr. Gary and Mary’s sons, and they love each other a lot. Thank you for Dr. Gary’s vision to have that school to give an opportunity to a lot of kids to study and be prepared. Our daughters are learning English, so I am proud of that, too.

Thank you to the Youngs and to you. Thank you very much.

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The Young Living Academy today.

 

The Ecuador Team

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GARY: This is the distillery in Ecuador. I want you to meet our Ecuador team, Nicholas, our general manager of the Ecuador farm, and Eugenio, our distillery manager. I met Eugenio’s family in Ecuador in Cuenca when I started there in June 2005. I hired him and started training him as my distillery operator. Eleven years later, he manages the entire distillery operation in Ecuador. His beautiful wife, Rosa, and daughters, Naeli and Lisette, are also here.

Folliowing the ylang ylang harvest with Nicolas the farm manager on right.

The ylang ylang harvest, with Nicholas, the farm manager, on the right.

MARY: Yes, it’s a really interesting story I want to tell you quickly. When we met them in Cuenca, they were the caretakers of the building that Gary was leasing. We were friendly with everybody, so when Eugenio had a little bit of a cold, we went down to visit them to see what we could do to help. They were living in just one room on the ground floor of the building.

The floor was dirt, and there was a wire that went from one side of the room to the other. They used an old blanket or something over the wire to split the room in half. One half was the kitchen, which had just a little pot and a little stove; and the other side was a place where they slept, which was just cardboard and mattresses on the floor. We looked at that and thought, “Oh, this is horrid.”

As we talked, we found out that they had two little girls. “Well, where are they?” we asked.

They replied, “We didn’t have enough money to bring them with us, so they’re at home in Peru with their grandparents.”

Gary said, “No, no, no, no, no; we cannot have this.” So he sent Eugenio home to get the girls. Their daughter, Lisette, is 6 months older than Jacob. They were babies and grew up together.

Gary and Mary Young with Nicholas, Eugenio, and his family at the 2016 Grand Convention in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Ylang Ylang—The “Flower of Flowers”

Distributors and staff at the Master Distributor Retreat in Guayaquil, Ecuador

Distributors and staff at the Master Distributor Retreat in June enjoyed harvesting ylang ylang flowers on the YL farm in Guayaquil, Ecuador.

Ylang ylang means “flower of flowers” and was named such because the tree has beautiful, fragrant flowers, from which a powerful essential oil is steam distilled.

The oil is used in hair formulas, to balance female-male energies, to restore peace and positive thoughts, and as an aphrodisiac. It is also used for supporting normal blood pressures, easing minor motion sickness, and contains a host of other health-enhancing properties.

Ylang ylang originates from Madagascar and is being grown on the Young Living farm in Guayaquil, Ecuador. In the Young Living ylang ylang groves, it’s harvest time again, although the main production time for ylang ylang runs from February to May.

During the recent Master Leader Retreat in June, distributors had the opportunity to harvest ylang ylang flowers and plant new trees. They thoroughly enjoyed learning how to correctly harvest the flowers for the greatest yield and highest therapeutic value.

They learned that just as the monsoon rains start to end, the trees load up with water from the rain and put on flowers. The flowers then become very heavily laden with the water, which increases the glucose, or what we call the Brix, in the flower; and that all converts to essential oil, which is very exciting.

Because of the beautiful fragrance, we have ylang ylang trees around our house and have our windows open at night to let in the breeze. On the farm a gentle breeze blows most of the time, and it’s most refreshing. It keeps the air clean and helps to move out the mosquitos during mosquito time.

But at night when it’s cool and that breeze blows in through the windows, the whole house fills with the fragrance of the ylang ylang flower, because the ylang ylang tree produces the most oil in the flowers during the nighttime and early morning, before the heat of the day.

Part 8: Finding Pure Essential Oils

Mr. Abdullah Hamden, Gary Young, Mahmoud Suhail, M.D. and Cole Woolley at the Young Living distillery

Mr. Abdullah Hamden; Gary Young; Mahmoud Suhail, M.D.; and Cole Woolley at the YL distillery

In November of 2006, I found myself in Ecuador expanding Young Living’s farmland.  I purchased 1,125 acres of raw, virgin land and filed a lease/claim on an additional 1,200 acres in 2007.

In March of 2010, our farm operations expanded into Salalah, Oman, the heart of the frankincense land in Arabia.  Currently, we are leasing a 3,400-square-meter farm, which produces bananas, pomegranates, lemons, coconuts, and papayas.

Young Living has agreements with local harvesters to secure our supply of Omani resin, which is distilled in our newest Young Living distillery located on our farm in Salalah. The distillery has two distillers and a two-room building with an office. From there the Boswellia sacra (Sacred Frankincense) oil is shipped to the Young Living warehouse in Utah from where it is distributed worldwide.

Here is a summary of our Young Living farms and what we grow at each:

Farm 1: St. Maries, Idaho (lavender, melissa, Idaho tansy, and various conifers)

Farm 2: Provence, France (lavender; leased farm in central France, which I no longer lease)

Farm 3: Mona, Utah (lavender, clary sage, hyssop, goldenrod, Roman chamomile, and other small crops)

Farm 4: Simiane, France (lavender; located in the southern region of France)

Farm 5: Naples, Idaho, just south of the Canadian border (balsam fir trees)

Farm 6: Guayaquil, Ecuador (ruta, palo santo, dorado azul, eucalyptus blue, zaragosa, rosa  morta, oregano, ylang ylang, ishpingo, ocotea, and other exotic oils; located in the rural area of Chongon on the outskirts of Guayaquil)

Farm 7: Salalah, Oman (bananas, pomegrantes, lemons, coconuts,  and papayas)

To be continued . . .