The Beauty of True Lavender

Jean-Noel Landel (in the dark blue t-shirt) shows Young Living members the finer points of wildcrafting the wild lavender plants on the hillside in France.
Jean-Noel Landel (in the dark blue t-shirt) shows Young Living members the finer points of wildcrafting in France.

In the first photo you see Jean-Noel Landel, my partner in France, who took our distributors on the mountain wildcrafting in France. This is wild lavender. It consists of little tiny plants. Now, do you want oil from that or would you rather have oil from our farms?

If we look at this, France would have to be 20 times bigger growing wild lavender in order to produce enough lavender for Young Living alone. Actually, it would be impossible. Wild lavender plants are very, very short. They’re also very, very tiny. They have small spikes and smaller flowers. The little bit of oil they produce is beautiful, but it’s unrealistic to think wild lavender could be counted on to provide enough lavender oil to meet customer demand. 

Next is the photo of a harvester I imported from France. That’s Eldon Knittle helping me cut lavender on the farm in Mona, Utah. That is also where we have greenhouses to grow the lavender starts. We grow an average of anywhere from one to three million plants every winter.

You are welcome to come visit the farm and see the operation for yourself.

We are growing true lavender at the Young Living Farm. Good nutrition grows beautiful plants! Drive by and look at one of our lavender fields. See all the different colors. The pictures don’t do justice to it. True lavender has many shades of color, everything from white to deep, deep violet purple. Varying colors are found only in true lavender. If you have lavender hybrids, the flowers are all the same color. It’s like taking a picture of a kid and making millions of photocopies of him. 

Gary and Eldon Knittle Harvest True Lavender.
Gary and Eldon Knittle Harvest True Lavender.