Composting and Worm Castings

Young Living’s Ecuador farm produces lots of composting material that comes from farm animals and from the extraction chambers after distillation of plants. Every bit of this is recycled as compost to enrich the soil.
Young Living’s Ecuador farm produces lots of composting material that comes from farm animals and from the extraction chambers after distillation of plants. Every bit of this is recycled as compost to enrich the soil.

 

Here is one of our composting yards at the farm in Ecuador. We also have a composting yard in Utah that you can see at our Mona farm. It’s a quarter of a mile down by the railroad tracks. We have many composting yards. We also have a composting yard at the farm in St. Maries.

In France every farm has its own composting yard. What goes into this composting yard? The material taken out of the extraction chambers, leaves, grass, anything that’s cut, goes into that composting yard.

On our farm in Utah, we have a lot of animals. Where does the manure go? Into that composting yard. We have a big machine down there. The trucks drop off the material, and then the big machine goes over it, grinds it, and mixes it together. It’s then piled and the plastic cover is put over it, so it can start sweating and developing that microbial action to break it down.

Here’s one of six of our big worm houses on the farm where we not only create the worm castings, but we also create liquid fertility. Do you know what happens when worms eat dirt? They poop. That’s called castings. What a word for excretion, huh? Castings.