The Lavender Deception (Continued)

aromatherapy book by Jean Valnet, MDOne of the chemical compounds in lavandin is camphene, which is known for its antiseptic, antibacterial, and analgesic properties. When used for these purposes, it is very valuable, as in the essential oil blend of Purification. However, camphene can burn the skin, which is why some people are uncomfortable using straight lavandin. Any burning sensation should be the first clue in discovering the mislabeling, since pure lavender does not contain camphene.

Lavandin may or may not be a little caustic to the skin, depending on its percentage of camphene, but when properly blended with other essential oils, it becomes pleasant to the skin and yet still has its same therapeutic effect. Obtaining this desired result is all in knowing how to formulate.

That also explains why some people complain about not getting the results they want with the lavender they buy from various retail outlets. They don’t know they are actually buying lavandin with camphene and not pure lavender. However, when lavandin is diluted with sufficient linalol, the camphene becomes undetectable to the end users, who then, unfortunately, think they are buying pure lavender.

There is a great example of how adulterated lavender causes problems. In Jean Valnet’s The Practice of Aromatherapy, he writes about a man being treated with lavender for a problem in his “sit-down area.” The man went on a journey but forgot his lavender, so he purchased a fresh supply. Valnet then writes about what happened. “Unfortunately this essence was neither natural nor pure: one single installation was followed by a painful inflammation of such severity that the unfortunate person was unable to sit down for more than a fortnight” (14 nights).

While I was visiting one of the distilleries in France, I watched the synthetic solution being put into the extracted oil that was poured into the barrels. I was very surprised when I saw the export tags on the barrels showing they were going to a new company in Utah. I even took a photo of the tag. I’m sure the people in Utah had no idea what they were getting, which is typical of most buyers.

14 thoughts on “The Lavender Deception (Continued)

  1. Thank you for sharing this sobering observation. It is time for me to ask more questions and not just remain a sleep when it comes to what I consume on this planet. I am concerned about becoming duped by smiling marketing organization who bank on people who do not hold them accountable to deliver healthy and natural product to the world.

  2. In your article The Lavender Deception I read that any burning sensation should be the first clue in discovering the mislabeling, since pure lavender does not contain camphene. With this stated my husband had a a wound on his leg I put a drop of Lavender on it and it burned. Now I have read many testimonials of mothers using Lavender on children with open cuts so this is why I chose this oil. So does this mean that the bottle I was using was mis-labeled?

  3. Kellie: No, the lavender was not mislabeled. Lavender is one of the gentlest of essential oils. But each person has their own individual body chemistry and reacts differently to oils. Putting the oil on an open wound can sting a little, which is different than putting it on the skin that is not broken. Helichrysum and myrrh are the two oils that we have used on open wounds. I know that when my youngest son was attacked by a dog with terrible damage done to his face, Mary and I poured helichrysum to stop the bleeding and the pain and then applied sandalwood (among other oils) to help heal the wound. None of the oils burned him, and his face healed beautifully. I hope your husband’s leg wound healed quickly as well.

    Gary

  4. HI Gary, thankyou for information on Lavender. I am a new 2011 YL Distributor. I will be traveling to France in 2012. I was wondering if its ok to visit your Farm in Rotonde to view the wonderful Lavender growing and see a distilling process etc.
    Regards Melissa

  5. Melissa,

    You are absolutely welcome to visit our farm in France! Please contact our main office for more information.

  6. Hi Gary, Just wondering what a tell tale sign of poor lavender is. My wife works in a hospital clinic and was wearing YL Lavender. A patient noticed the aroma remarked that Lavender made her feel nauseous and sick. My wife didn’t say anything but noticed that over the next 30 minutes the patient didn’t experience any kind of symptoms to the aroma. Which makes me wonder, what effect ‘poor’ lavender might have on someone inhaling it?

    And if they burn it (which you shouldn’t do with E oils anyway) do they still get the same ill effects?
    Anthony

  7. Hi Gary, just wondering what the tell tale signs or effects of adulterated or poor lavender are on someone inhaling it? And if they burn it (which they shouldn’t it) do they still get the same ill effect?

  8. Just recently my wife had a patient come to the clinic where she works, and my wife happened to be wearing YL Lavender. The patient remarked that Lavender made her feel sick and nauseous. Half an hour later, nothing happened, even though my wife remained in her presence. Could this be explained by the fact that the patient is usually smelling adulterated or synthetic lavender oils? Can YL lavender ever have the same effect if a person is experiencing detox?

  9. Hi Gary, my wife had a patient come to the clinic where she works, and my wife happened to be wearing YL Lavender. The patient remarked that Lavender made her feel sick and nauseous. Half an hour later, nothing happened. Could this be explained by the fact that she must be smelling adulterated or synthetic lavender oils?

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